Ramen Can Be Gourmet Too: Simple Ways to Jazz Up Your Noodles

Ramen. We all know it as a college student cuisine, or even the taboo "food of the empty-pocketed." Some chefs might just laugh at the thought of making something with Ramen. Personally I love Ramen, and it's a great base for an endless array of culinary creations. Never limit yourself to only the flavor packets. With a few simple pantry staples, and maybe some leftovers, you can make your own, unique Ramen dish. This is your chance to be creative AND resourceful in a pinch!

I also have a recipe for Pad Thai made out of Ramen in a previous blog you can see here.




Soy Sauce: A major ingredient in Asian cuisine, soy sauce gives a rich and salty flavor to food. Use it in lieu of salt, and go easy on it, it can become overpowering when used in excess.

Crushed Red Chili Flake: Yup, just like the kind you find at pizzerias. Add some spice with this, but remember, a little goes a long way! Although there are many types of heat you can use, I fond that this ingredient offers a clean heat that compliments other flavors well.

Sesame Oil: Another popular ingredient in Asian cuisine, seasame oil offers a very unique flavor that is near impossible to duplicate. Sesame oil gives a richness/thickness to Ramen, with a round toasty flavor that makes the noodles pop.

Ginger: You can use fresh or dried/ground varieties, it offers a more subtle spice and tang to a dish.

Hot Sauce: For you tabasco lovers, you can use it in Ramen too!

Cayanne Pepper: Doesn't provide as clean of a heat as the red pepper flakes, but it much more potent. If you're a spice lover, this might be your medicine.

Lime Juice: For some brightness and tang, squeeze some fresh lime juice in your noodles.

Leftovers: Got some leftover roasted chicken? Or maybe some leftover steak/fajitas/pot roast? You can use it in your Ramen! Be sure to cut the meat into little cubes, or slice it very thinly, you can even shred it - whichever works for you.

Avocado: The creamy and cool tastes of the avocado compliment a hot bowl of Ramen very nicely. Tortilla soup has avocado in it, so think of it as a cross of cultures. Trust me, it works quite nicely, especially if you're making a spicy Ramen.

Garlic: You can use fresh cloves or the powder to pump up your cup of noodles.

Veggies: vegetables are a great addition to Ramen. Carrots, cabbage, tomato, mushrooms, white onion, green onion (my favorite), and squash bring nutritional value and more flavors to your bowl.


I always enjoy opportunities in the kitchen when I can utilize leftovers and my many miscellanous spices and herbs to make a new combination, and it works out very nicely when Ramen is involved. I do love cooking, but this is a great remedy for those days where I don't feel like cooking, or I want something fast, or maybe the kitchen is dirty from one of my baking sprees. Any chance where I can get resourceful in the kitchen always makes me feel accomplished. So take a look in your pantry and in your fridge, and turn a plain bowl of Ramen into a real treat!

1 comment:

  1. Ramen chow mein is da bomb, and it takes like 4 minutes.

    Cook the noodles for 5-10 SECONDS in a pot of boiling water, take them out, and set them on a plate. Heat up peanut oil on high heat and fry up onions, carrots, shrimp, baby bok choi, whatevs. then add the noodles (they should be a bit softer after sitting and steaming a little).

    remember 5 chinese flavors are salty, sour, sweet, spicy/bitter, and fishy. The meals really stand out when you have a little of each (i like extra spicy tho).

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